OKN’s Indigenous Reconciliation initiative considers Truth and Reconciliation as two distinct entities, as illustrated above. Learn more about this graphic in our Indigenous Reconciliation Strategy.

Children spend a great deal of their first 8 years learning in schools, thus, how schools connect to their community is important. Progress in this area will show good connections between schools, parents, community resources and the local neighbourhood.
Indicators:

  • Parental involvement in schools
  • Youth as resources
  • Volunteerism
  • Community use of schools
Children thrive in neighbourhoods that are safe and connected. Neighbourhoods that can meet all of our needs are valued.
Indicators:

  • Neighbourhood safety
  • Neighbourhood cohesion
  • Walkability
  • Caring for the community
Safe environments benefit children by providing a sense of personal security that allows them to take maximum advantage of learning, playing and making new friendships.
Indicators:

  • Child care capacity
  • Quality child care
  • Parenting capacity
  • Parental monitoring
  • Quality time at home with family
Safe environments benefit children by providing a sense of personal security that allows them to take maximum advantage of learning, playing and making new friendships.
Indicators:

  • Serious injury
  • At-risk behaviours
  • Safety from harm
All children need positive connections to their parents/caregivers, peers, school and community.
Indicators:

  • Supportive and caring environments
  • Boundaries and expectations
  • Commitment to learning
  • Positive values
  • Social competencies

Learning is one of the cornerstones for success in life and starts at birth. Community progress for this result will show that children are learning both in their preschool and school years.
Indicators:

  • Preschool learning opportunities
  • Student achievement (EQAO)
  • Healthy body weight
  • School engagement

Good health is a prerequisite for positive outcomes for children and youth. Both physical and emotional health are valued in this result. In addition, given the critical brain development that takes place in the first 12 months of life, infant health is closely monitored.
Indicators:

  • At-risk births
  • Healthy eating
  • Healthy body weight
  • Physical activity
  • Mental health

Resource Hub

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that she or he volunteers without pay in the community. This question is adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey for Children and Youth (NLSCY).

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Percentage of grade 3 students meeting provincial expectations for reading (Levels 3 and 4). Includes all eligible students including those that did not participate in the EQAO assessment.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they have been seriously injured (requiring medical attention by a doctor, nurse, or dentist) in the past 12 months.

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Percentage of parents of 5-year old children reporting that their child has been seriously injured (requiring medical attention by a doctor, nurse, or dentist) in the past 12 months.

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Percentage 12-yr olds reporting feelings of safety at home, school, and in the neighbourhood where they live.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they have been bullied at school in the past 12 months. Bullying could be any type including comments about their race or colour, comments about their religion, inappropriate sexual comments or gestures, or bullied for being gay, lesbian or bisexual. The definition of bullying, which is also given in the survey is: “Bullying is when one or more people tease, hurt or upset another person on purpose, again and again. It is also bullying when someone is left out of things on purpose. Bullying may involve physical or verbal attacks, internet or electronic bullying, damage to property, etc.”.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting at least one episode in the past 12 months of drinking more than five alcoholic drinks on one occasion.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of school engagement. Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they are actively engaged in learning as measured by a seven-item scale (importance of: getting good grades, making friends at school, participating in extra-curricular activities, getting to class on time, learning new things, expressing one’s opinion in class, involvement on student council). These questions are adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey on Child and Youth (NLSCY).

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of participation in youth programs. Youth programs are defined as sports teams or clubs, using the local library, attending a religious service, attending a youth program, and participating in a music, dance, drama, or other arts program. These questions are adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

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Percentage of grade 9 students meeting provincial expectations for applied math (Levels 3 and 4). Includes all eligible students including those that did not participate in the EQAO assessment.

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Percentage of grade 9 students meeting provincial expectations for academic math (Levels 3 and 4). Includes all eligible students including those that did not participate in the EQAO assessment.

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Percentage of grade 6 students meeting provincial expectations for reading (Levels 3 and 4). Includes all eligible students including those that did not participate in the EQAO assessment.

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Percent of 5-yr olds developmentally vulnerable on 1 or more domains. Percentage of 5-yr olds assessed in the lowest 10th Percentile on one or more Early Developmental Instrument (EDI) domains

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting they experience caring neighbours. This question was developed by the OKN research team.

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Percent of 5-yr olds attending children’s programs in past 12 months. Percentage of parents reporting that, in the past 12-months, their 5-yr old has participated in a children’s program, family reading program, organized team sport, physical activity of recreation program, or a music, arts or dance program.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they do not have low self-esteem (i.e. have moderate to high self-esteem). The questions were adapted from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) survey, which adapted from the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965). Each item has a 5-point response scale, ranging from “Never” to “Always.” An overall indicator for moderate to high self-esteem is defined as responding either neutrally or positively (higher esteem) to at least 3 of the 6 items (i.e., “always”, “often”, or “sometimes” for positive statements; “never”, “rarely” or “sometimes” for negative statements).

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The Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they are optimistic about their personal future as measured by three items: feeling good about their personal future (developed by the OKN research team), and that school will help them get where they want to go in the future (from the Ministry of Education’s sample School Effectiveness survey questions).

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Percentage of 12-yr olds that report being physically active for at least 60 minutes a day, five days a week, in the past seven days. Physical activity is defined as “any activity that increases your heart rate and makes you breathe hard some of the time. Physical activity can be done in sports, school activities, while playing or for transportation. Some examples include: running, brisk walking, rollerblading, biking, dancing, skateboarding, swimming, soccer, basketball, and football.” This survey item was adapted from the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) and corresponds to the most recent 2011 Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Youth (Ages 12-17).

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of personal power as measured by three items: feeling control of life, being able to deal with frustration, and the ability to overcome problems in a positive way. Responses across the 3 items are summed and scores – 12 are scored as high.

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Percent of 12-yr olds considered to be overweight or obese. Calculated using self-reported height (inches) and weight (pounds). Overweight = BMI >85th Percentile, or obese BMI >97th Percentile, based on grade and sex. The underweight and healthy weight categories are combined, and the overweight and obese categories are combined for reporting purposes.

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Percent of 5-year olds considered to be overweight or obese. Calculated using self-report height and weight. Overweight = BMI >85th Percentile, or obese BMI >97th Percentile, based on grade and sex. The underweight and healthy weight categories are combined, and the overweight and obese categories are combined for reporting purposes.

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Percentage of infants born weighing < 2500 grams (5lbs. 8oz.).

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Percentage of newborns that score > 9 on the Parkyn Screening Tool.

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Percent of 12-year olds at risk for depression.

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Percentage of 12-year olds that report eating breakfast daily.

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Percent of 12-yr olds who have been involved in some type of criminal activity. Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting any involvement in the following activities in the past 12 months: damaged or destroyed property that did not belong to you; carried a weapon for the purpose of defending yourself or using it in a fight; sold any drugs; or been part of a gang that broke the law by stealing, hurting someone, or damaging property.

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Percent of 12-yr olds experiencing a caring school climate: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that their school provides a caring, encouraging environment as measured by a 3-item scale (most teachers have high expectations of me, most teachers are interested in me as a person, most teachers notice when I am doing well in school). These questions are adapted from the Ministry of Education sample School Effectiveness Survey questions. Each item was given a score of one to four, with one being given for a strongly agree response and four being given for a strongly disagree response. Students with a score of 3 or less are considered to see school as providing a caring, encouraging environment.

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Percent of parents of 5-yr olds reporting high levels of parental involvement in their child’s school: Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds reporting high levels of parent involvement as measured by a four item scale. The four items include attending a general school meeting, attending a parent-teacher conference, attending a school or class event and volunteering in the school. Each of the four items were scored on a three-point scale with one being never, two being once or twice and three being more than three times. These four items were summed together and those parents that scored nine and above were considered to have high parental involvement in the school.

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Percent of 12-yr olds who report spending high amounts of quality time with their families at home: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that in the past six months, they have spent quality time at home with their family.

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Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds children reporting they have ever participated in a community activity or event at school.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting a strong sense that they can make a difference in their community.

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Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds children reporting their child has ever participated in a community activity or event at school.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they live walking distance to a public park or athletic field.

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Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds reporting that they live walking distance to a public park or athletic field.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they walk, bike, or rollerblade to or from school all five days each week. The item is scored on a four-point scale with one being Rarely/Never, two being 1-2 days per week, three being 3-4 days per week, and four being all 5 days. It is analyzed as “All 5 Days” compared to “0-4 times per week”.

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Percentage of parents of 5-year old children reporting that their neighbourhood is safe for children.

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Percentage of parents of 5-year old children reporting high social cohesion in their neighbourhood.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of caring about others in their community: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they place high value on helping other people as measured by a two-item scale. Students were asked: (1) how often they serve others in their community, and (2) to what degree they help make their community a better place. Each of the items were rated on a four-point scale with one being not at all or rarely, two being sometimes, three being very or often, and four being almost always. These two items were summed together and students that scored six and above were considered to have high levels of caring.

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Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds reporting receiving child care on a regular basis from someone other than a parent.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of positive family communication: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting his or her parent(s) communicate positively as measured by a two-item scale (if their parents listen to their ideas and opinions, and if they participate in problem solving together). These questions are adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). Items were scored on a five-point scale with one being never, two being rarely, three being sometimes, four being often and five being always. The two items were summed together and youth scoring – 8 were considered to have high levels of positive family communication.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting placing high value on promoting equality and solving social problems.

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Number of licensed child care spaces per 100 children aged 0 – 12 years old (Ontario Child Care Management System (OCCMS)).

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Percent of 12-yr olds experiencing high levels of family boundaries: The Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that their family has clear rules and consequences and monitors their whereabouts as measured by a 3-item scale (their family has clear rules and consequences; (2) her or his parent(s) monitors the young person’s whereabouts; and (3) parents know who they are with). These questions are adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). Each of the three items were scored on a five-point scale with one being never, two being rarely, three being sometimes, four being often and five being always. These three items were summed together and youth scoring twelve and above were considered to have high family boundaries.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting they have a family meal at least once a day: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that during a usual school week (Monday to Friday), they eat a meal with at least one adult member of his or her family at least once a day.

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Percent of 5-yr olds reporting they have a family meal at least once a day: Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds reporting that during a usual school week (Monday to Friday), they eat a meal together at least once a day.

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Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds reporting they feel comfortable asking for advice about parenting.

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Percentage of parents of 5-yr olds reporting they feel close to other parents with children the same age.

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Percent of 12-yr olds with strong bonds to their school: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they care about their school as measured by a 2-item scale (degree to which they: like/love school; proud of their school). These questions are adapted from the Queen’s University Survey on Health Behaviour in School Age Children, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), respectively.

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Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting high spiritual engagement as measured by a 2-item scale (spiritual or religious values play an important role in their life, and help them find meaning). These questions were developed by the Halton District Catholic School Board researchers.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of positive peer influence: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that their best friends model responsible behaviour as measured by a four-item scale (if their close friends: like school; get along with their parent(s); smoke cigarettes; use drugs). These questions come from the Queen’s University Survey on Health Behaviour in School Age Children.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of peer connectedness: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting that they get along with their peers. High peer connectedness is measured by a 4-item scale (I have many friends; I get along with others the same age; most others my age like me; and others my age want me to be their friend). These questions are adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). Each of the four items were scored on a five-point scale with one being false, two being mostly false, three being sometimes true/sometimes false, four being mostly true and five being true. The four items were summed together and students scoring – 16 were considered to show high peer connectedness.

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Percent of 12-yr olds reporting high levels of family support: Percentage of 12-yr olds reporting their family provides high levels of nurturing and support in the past 6 months as measured by a 3-item scale (parents are proud of them, they feel appreciated, and receive praise and smiles from their parents). These questions are adapted from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). Each of the three items were scored on a five-point scale with one being never, two being rarely, three being sometimes, four being often and five being always. These three items were summed together and youth scoring twelve and above were considered to show high levels of family support.

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Percent of 5-year olds eating daily breakfast.

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