Indicators

Halton Youth Impact Survey Results

Are recreation and leisure opportunities accessible to all children and youth in Halton?

A bunch of students walk together with colorful backpacks on their back

Findings reflect the responses of 1915 youth in the 13 to 18 age range.

Wellbeing icon

Availability of leisure and recreation opportunities

Whether respondents reported opportunities to enjoy nature in their neighbourhood, and culture and recreation facilities they could easily get to. It is derived from two items: “There are plenty of opportunities to enjoy nature in my neighbourhood” and “There are recreation and culture facilities that are easy for me to get to.” Respondents rated these items on a scale ranging from “Strongly disagree” to “Strongly agree.”
Satisfaction icon

Satisfaction with the quality of recreation and culture facilities

Whether or not respondents were satisfied with recreation and culture facilities. Satisfied respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statement: “The quality of the recreation and culture facilities in my community is very high.”
Barriers icon

Barriers to recreation

Barriers to recreation reported by respondents, including: “I do not have enough time to participate,” “I do not have anyone to participate with, “I do not have the money to participate,” “There is not a recreation centre nearby that I can get to,” “There is not a park nearby that I can get to,” “I do not have access to public transportation.” Respondents perceiving barriers to recreation are those who agreed or strongly agreed with at least one of these statements.
Systemic barriers icon

Systemic barriers

Systemic barriers are barriers that are best addressed with changes to programs, services, and systems that perpetuate inequities. Agreement with any of the following statements indicated experience of systemic barriers: “I do not have the money to participate,” “There is not a recreation centre nearby that I can get to,” “There is not a park nearby that I can get to,” “I do not have access to public transportation.”
Barriers for the disabled icon

Young people living with a disability

Respondents were asked if they had a long-term physical or mental condition that limited their ability to fully participate in their community, school, work, or other activities. Respondents who had a limitation in at least one of those environments were considered as respondents living with a disability.1
Economic barriers icon

Food insecurity as a proxy for inadequate income

Food insecurity means not having consistent access to enough food for a healthy and active life. It is when people worry about running out of food or do not have the resources to buy the types of food they need. The Halton Youth Impact Survey assessed food insecurity with seven items.2 Respondents with at least one affirmative answer to any of the seven items were considered to have experienced some degree of food insecurity in the previous year. Household food insecurity is a marker of material deprivation, closely linked to other social and economic disadvantage indicators.3 This indicator is used as a proxy for inadequate income in this bulletin.

When households have inadequate income, they may struggle to consistently afford enough food, leading to food insecurity. Inadequate income impacts not only food security but also other basic needs with health consequences beyond poor nutrition.4,5 Although we have chosen to adopt food security as a proxy for inadequate income, it is essential to recognize that it does not capture the entirety of a household’s financial situation.

1 The definition of disability employed here is in line with that adopted by UNICEF and described on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. This is a human right’s-based definition where persons with disabilities are “those who have a long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others”. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. (2006). United Nations. https://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-withdisabilities. UNICEF (2014). Definition and Classification of Disability. https://www.unicef.org/lac/en/reports/definition-and-classification-disability

2 “Some young people go to school or to bed hungry because there is not enough food at home. How often does this happen to you?” and how often were the following things true for you in the past 12 months: “I ate only a few kinds of low-cost foods because we could not buy food,” “Our family could not afford the food for more balanced meals,” “I did not eat enough because there was not enough money for food,” “I ate smaller meals because there was not enough money for food,” “I skipped meals because there was not enough money for food,” “I did not eat for a whole day because there was not enough money for food.” Our Kids Network (2022). Supporting Families to Champion Positive Youth Development: an outlook on youth’s experiences of discrimination, homelessness and food insecurity.

3 Tarasuk, V., Li, T., Fafard St-Germain, A.A. (2022). Household food insecurity in Canada, 2021. Retrieved from https://proof.utoronto.ca/ .

4 Ibid.

5 PROOF. (2022). Food Insecurity: A problem of inadequate income, not solved by food. FACTSHEET – OCTOBER 2022.

Limitations

  • This bulletin covers only responses of youth in the 13-18 age range.
  • Open invitation sampling strategy (non-probabilistic).
  • Sample is not necessarily representative of all children and youth living in Halton.
  • It is not possible to determine a response rate.
  • However, considering the geographic coverage and the size of the final sample, it’s fair to assume that we have a reasonably good cross-section of children and youth living in Halton.
  • A higher degree of diversity within this sample calls for caution when interpreting overall ratios. For more details on the composition of the sample see the sociodemographic table.
  • The data are meant to provide a snapshot of youth wellbeing during COVID, and caution should be used when comparing across time.
  • While each indicator is important, using multiple indicators as evidence of strengths and needs provides a more comprehensive representation.
  • This is a self-report survey and several types of response bias have been identified related to self-report surveys. Use caution when interpreting the findings.