OKN’s Indigenous Reconciliation initiative considers Truth and Reconciliation as two distinct entities, as illustrated above. Learn more about this graphic in our Indigenous Reconciliation Strategy.

Children spend a great deal of their first 8 years learning in schools, thus, how schools connect to their community is important. Progress in this area will show good connections between schools, parents, community resources and the local neighbourhood.
Indicators:

  • Parental involvement in schools
  • Youth as resources
  • Volunteerism
  • Community use of schools
Children thrive in neighbourhoods that are safe and connected. Neighbourhoods that can meet all of our needs are valued.
Indicators:

  • Neighbourhood safety
  • Neighbourhood cohesion
  • Walkability
  • Caring for the community
Safe environments benefit children by providing a sense of personal security that allows them to take maximum advantage of learning, playing and making new friendships.
Indicators:

  • Child care capacity
  • Quality child care
  • Parenting capacity
  • Parental monitoring
  • Quality time at home with family
Safe environments benefit children by providing a sense of personal security that allows them to take maximum advantage of learning, playing and making new friendships.
Indicators:

  • Serious injury
  • At-risk behaviours
  • Safety from harm
All children need positive connections to their parents/caregivers, peers, school and community.
Indicators:

  • Supportive and caring environments
  • Boundaries and expectations
  • Commitment to learning
  • Positive values
  • Social competencies

Learning is one of the cornerstones for success in life and starts at birth. Community progress for this result will show that children are learning both in their preschool and school years.
Indicators:

  • Preschool learning opportunities
  • Student achievement (EQAO)
  • Healthy body weight
  • School engagement

Good health is a prerequisite for positive outcomes for children and youth. Both physical and emotional health are valued in this result. In addition, given the critical brain development that takes place in the first 12 months of life, infant health is closely monitored.
Indicators:

  • At-risk births
  • Healthy eating
  • Healthy body weight
  • Physical activity
  • Mental health

Early Years Mental Health Toolkit

Research has shown that early experiences shape the developing brain and provide the foundation for an individual’s mental health and well-being. The social-emotional skills developed in the first six years of a child’s life are linked to their later success in school, work and ability to form healthy relationships. The Early Years Mental Health Toolkit is aimed at building the capacity of providers to support and promote the mental well-being of infants, young children and their families.

If you have questions about the toolkit please contact Allison Corcoran, Supervisor, Infant & Child Development Services, Children’s Services, Halton Region at allison.corcoran@halton.ca or Karen Hay, Supervisor, Early Years, Health, Halton Region at karenhay@halton.ca

Social-Emotional Development in the Early Years: A Common Message Paper 2nd ed.

A comprehensive resource that presents: evidence-informed information from various organizations to support the healthy social and emotional development of young children. It highlights key factors that influence this process and provides a list of common messages along with relevant support and information to assist professionals in promoting the well-being of children.

Download the Social-Emotional Development in the Early Years: A Common Message Paper (2nd Ed.).

Children in school

Early Years Mental Health Committee

The Halton Early Years Mental Health Committee (EYMHC) is a cross-sector collaboration of service providers who work with infants/young children and their families. Through this partnership, the committee’s efforts have been focused on ensuring that families are strong and stable, emotionally healthy and equipped to nurture their children so that they are ready to learn and reach their full potential.

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Group of happy children standing and holding hands in park

Early Years Commuinty Model

The EYMHC, working across the continuum of early years mental health, has developed a number of tools and resources for service providers working with infants and young children 0 to 6 years of age to promote the healthy social-emotional development of young children. More…

Community Model InfographicClick to view the Community Model Infographic

A multi-ethnic group of school children are stacking toy blocks at preschool. They are inside a colorful and sunlit preschool. A little girl of African descent is concentrating on stacking toy blocks.

Early Years 8 Areas of Focus

The Social-Emotional Development in the Early Years: A Common Message Paper (2nd Ed.) is a comprehensive guide to the eight areas of focus that are critical to healthy social-emotional development.

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An Asian family is indoors in a bedroom. They are wearing casual clothing and pajamas. They are reading a storybook together in bed.

Early Years Screening and Community Model of Care

The universal screening of infants/young children’s social-emotional development can help improve an infant or young child’s access to services and mental health outcomes and identify factors that might derail healthy social-emotional development.

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OKN organization graphic